Lens

ページ名:Camera Lens 2.8

~作成中~


 ≡ Reference
Panel: Properties > Object Data Properties > Lens

Lens

Type

The camera lens options control the way 3D objects are represented in a 2D image.

Perspective

This matches how you view things in the real world. Objects in the distance will appear smaller than objects in the foreground, and parallel lines (such as the rails on a railroad) will appear to converge as they get farther away.

Orthographic

With Orthographic perspective objects always appear at their actual size, regardless of distance. This means that parallel lines appear parallel, and do not converge like they do with Perspective.


../_images/render_cameras_traintracks-orthographic-BI.jpg
Render from the same camera angle as the previous examples, but with orthographic perspective.


Panoramic

Panoramic cameras only work in Cycles. See the Cycles panoramic camera settings for more information.
panoramic camera

Focal Length

(Perspective)
/Field of View
The focal length controls the amount of zoom, i.e. the amount of the scene which is visible all at once. Longer focal lengths result in a smaller FOV (more zoom), while short focal lengths allow you to see more of the scene at once (larger FOV, less zoom).
Focal Length
テキスト FOV テキスト


../_images/render_cameras_traintracks-perspective-BI.jpg
Perspective camera with 35 mm focal length.


../_images/render_cameras_traintracks-perspective-telephoto-BI.jpg
Perspective camera with 210 mm focal length instead of 35 mm.


Lens Unit

(Perspective)
The focal length can be set either in terms of millimeters or the actual Field of View as an angle.
Field of View


../_images/render_cameras_perspective.svg

+Hint

While the camera is moving towards an object the Focal Length property can be decreased to produce a Dolly Zoom camera effect, or vice versa.


This video demonstrates the Dolly Zoom camera effect.
https://vimeo.com/15837189

Orthographic Scale

(Orthographic)
This controls the apparent size of objects projected on the image.


Note that this is effectively the only setting which applies to orthographic perspective. Since parallel lines do not converge in orthographic mode (no vanishing points), the lens shift settings are equivalent to translating the camera in the 3D View.


../_images/render_cameras_orthographic.svg


Shift X/Y

Allows for the adjustment of vanishing points. Vanishing points refer to the positions to which parallel lines converge. In these render examples, the most obvious vanishing point is at the end of the railroad.


../_images/render_cameras_traintracks-perspective-lens-shift-BI.jpg
Horizontal lens shift of 0.330.


../_images/render_cameras_traintracks-perspective-rotate-BI.jpg
Rotation of the camera object instead of a lens shift.


Notice how the horizontal lines remain perfectly horizontal when using the lens shift, but do get skewed when rotating the camera object.


iNote

Using lens shift is equivalent to rendering an image with a larger FOV and cropping it off-center.


Clip Start/End

The interval in which objects are directly visible, Any objects outside this range still influence the image indirectly, as further light bounces are not clipped.


iNote

For viewport rendering, setting clipping distances to limited values is important to ensure sufficient rasterization precision. Ray tracing renders do not suffer from this issue so much, and as such more extreme values can safely be set.

iTip
When Limits in the Display panel is enabled, the clip bounds will be visible as two yellow connected dots on the camera line of sight.

 > See also

3D View clipping
https://docs.blender.org/manual/ja/2.82/editors/3dview/properties/sidebar.html